Sonoma Sun Event Calendar

Oakmont Sunday Symposium Oakmont East Recreation Center

Sunday March 4th - 10:30am

The Oakmont Sunday Symposium provides a forum for speakers on diverse topics such as science, history, politics, culture and current events. Attendance is intended for Oakmont residents and their invited guests. Symposiums take place from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the East Recreation Center. There is a $3 suggested donation. Find out more at oakmontsundaysymposium.org. All Oakmont residents and their guests are welcome.

March 4 – “Academy Awards: Let’s go to the movies,” by Ky Boyd

Ky Boyd is beloved in Oakmont as the proprietor of Rialto Cinemas. In 2017, Boyd said if he could have dinner with three filmmakers, they would be Aaron Sorkin, Martin Sheen and Kate Winslet. Maybe he’ll have better luck this year with Frances McDormand, Jessica Chastain or Judi Dench! Boyd will speak about the highs and lows of this year’s Oscar nominations and is asking Oakmonters to come prepared to vote for their favorites in the major categories.

March 11 – “What’s it like to live in an oil fracking zone? My time in a North Dakota oil boomtown,” by Blaire Briody

Author Blaire Briody will show a short documentary film and discuss the research for her book, The New Wild West: Black Gold, Fracking, and Life in a North Dakota Boomtown, which tells the story of how a small town in North Dakota suddenly became the new frontier of U.S. energy independence. In recent years, companies have used fracking to tap into millions of barrels of oil, causing the U.S. to become the world’s largest crude oil producer, surpassing Russia and Saudi Arabia. Today, 9 out of ten oil and gas wells in the United States – adding up to some 82,000 active wells – use hydraulic fracturing. Briody is an award-winning journalist who has written for the New York Times, Popular Science, and Popular Mechanics, among others. She received the Richard J. Margolis Award in 2014 for social justice reporting. She teaches journalism at Santa Rosa Junior College and spent four years researching the book to find out what happens to a community when the energy industry is allowed to set up in a town with little regulation or oversight – and at what cost.